Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Matters of scale

Today I went to Amsterdam to visit a professional photo lab. I have some negatives from my past that need scanning for digital printing. Drum scanning? Or flatbed? I don't know. This isn't an area that I like or that I am comfortable with but I no longer have a choice.
It is all digital.
My 'art' camera is a nice little 4x5 Toyo field camera that lives on a tripod, covered and protected from dust by an old sweatshirt. The negatives are 4x5. I don't know where to buy more film here and I didn't even know where to process it until today. The professional lab does 4x5. Did you catch those numbers? They are common in photography.
35 millimeter (metric here)
120 millimeter (again, thanks for the confusion)
6x6.
6x7.
4x5.
8x10.
16x20.
20x24
30x40 (The near standard for exhibition prints or for people who like to make things that are otherwise boring, large.)
30x40.
Inches.
Ha.
I asked for scans to make 30x40 prints.
I was given a figure, 100 mega-bites or something.
I said, sure, but it has to make a 30x40 print, at least 300 dpi.
Did I say inches?
No.
So, my expensive scan can make a great 30x40 CENTIMETER print.

Thanks a billion England! (That's a billion pounds, btw)

However, while I was in Amsterdam, I did see something wonderful.

Free bicycle engraving for identification purposes!






















 Why have your bike engraved?

There are three reasons listed on the sign, poorly translated by me and google language tools.

1) It will make your bike less attractive.
2) It is easier for the owner to find the bicycle.
3) Recovered stolen bikes are returned home for free.

Hmmm. Ok. Mostly you got me with the little pictographs!
Is that Zorro?
Why is he sad? :(

1 comment:

  1. Maybe it's a picture of a wanna-be thief who's dismayed the bike is engraved??

    ReplyDelete